Australia

Australian stamps can be divided into two general periods: those printed when Australia was a collection of six British colonies, and those printed after 1912, when control of the postal system was centralized several years after the colonies gained their independence from Great Britain to form the Commonwealth of Australia. New South Wales, the first Australian colony to issue prepaid embossed letter sheets, a full year-and-a-half before similar products were introduced in England. Adhesive stamps came a decade after the debut of the Penny Black in London, but like those British stamps, the ones in New South Wales featured a portrait of Queen Victoria. Australian stamps labelled “Van Diemen’s Land” were issued between 1853 and 1857, by which time the island south of Australia’s southwestern-most tip was known as Tasmania, named for the Dutch explorer Abel Tasman. Postal rates across Australia were unified in 1913, which brought an end to the former colonies’ practice of issuing their own unique stamps. Probably the most iconic stamps of the early Commonwealth years are the kangaroo-and-map stamps, which appeared in 1912. While the stamp seems innocuous to 21st-century eyes, at the time it was used as a political football by Conservatives, who ridiculed the ruling Labor party’s Postmaster-General, Charles Frazer, for his childish design. There was also outrage in some quarters over the white Australia-shaped background, which Frazer openly described as indicative of “the Commonwealth’s policy in regard to its population.” Over the next few decades, the kangaroo would come and go depending on which party was in power.

Showing 1–180 of 506 results

Showing 1–180 of 506 results